News: Social Arts 101 & 102 Start Rescheduled for 1/29

YoungDancersThe first Lesson of the Winter/Spring Semester of Social Arts Classes has been rescheduled for this Friday, January 29, 2016

Social Arts 101 is for ages 11-13 and teaches through interactive exercises important social skill such as introductions, right-of-way, dining and managing social media. A social dance repertory is taught and includes the Box Step, Swig, Waltz, Merengue and Cha Cha.

Social Arts 102 is for ages 12-14. Completion of Social Arts 101 or its equivalent with another organization is required. This class builds on 101, always practicing basic skills and adding subjects important to young adult life such as interviewing and hosting events. Social dance skills are strengthened with leading and following exercises and this addition of traveling and turns.

Social Arts 101 meets at 6:00 pm and Social Arts 102 starts at 7:30 pm. These monthly hour-and-fifteen minute classes will meet January 29, February 19, March 25, April 22 and May 13. Classes are held at the International Montessori Academy just east of Little 5 Points. Tuition is $275. As of the publication of this post, registration remains open.

News: No Social Arts Classes This Evening, 1/22

snow-1015513_640Social Arts Atlanta has confirmed that the International Montessori Academy will be closing at noon today, Friday, January 22, 2016. Therefore classes for this evening are canceled.

These classes will be rescheduled and families contacted with this information as soon as possible.

News: Social Arts 101 & 102 Begin Tomorrow

StudentsReadySocial Arts Atlanta offers training in etiquette and social dance, providing the knowledge to builds skills, which leads to confidence.

The Winter/Spring Semester of Social Arts Classes begins Friday, January 22, 2016.

Social Arts 101 is for ages 11-13 and teaches through interactive exercises important social skill such as introductions, right-of-way, dining and managing social media. A social dance repertory is taught and includes the Box Step, Swig, Waltz, Merengue and Cha Cha.

Social Arts 102 is for ages 12-14. Completion of Social Arts 101 or its equivalent with another organization is required. This class builds on 101, always practicing basic skills and adding subjects important to young adult life such as interviewing and hosting events. Social dance skills are strengthened with leading and following exercises and this addition of traveling and turns.

Social Arts 101 meets at 6:00 pm and Social Arts 102 starts at 7:30 pm. These monthly hour-and-fifteen minute classes will meet January 22, February 19, March 25, April 22 and May 13. Classes are held at the International Montessori Academy just east of Little 5 Points. Tuition is $275. As of the publication of this post, registration remains open.

Notes: Success at the Museum

A parent whose son completed Social Arts 101 shared this success story with us. We hope you enjoy reading it!

My mom took John and Cindy to the Fernbank Museum recently. She relayed this story to me:
Cindy was thirsty and they didn’t know where the water fountain was located. John offered to find out. He left my mom and Cindy and made his way to the gentleman taking tickets at the entrance. (Mom said the man was pushing 80 years old. She kept her distance to see how John would handle the situation.)
John said “Excuse me, sir. My sister is thirsty, will you tell me where the water fountain is located.” The man told him. John offered his hand, they shook hands and John thanked him. As my mom walked by, the ticket taker complimented her on “that polite young man.”
I’m proud of John for his behavior, and thrilled this went down in front of my mom. Woo hoo! Sometimes it’s the little things…
Thanks for working with these kids. I know mine isn’t the easiest egg, and I really appreciate you offering your time and patience!
Note: The names have been changed in this post for privacy.

News: Social Arts Classes Start Soon

IntroductionThe Winter/Spring Semester of Social Arts Atlanta’s Social Arts Classes will begin Friday, January 22.

Social Arts 101 for ages 11-13/grades 6-8 is designed to give knowledge and practice. Interactive exercises demonstrate the importance of manners and key etiquette rules related to events such as introductions and dining. Each class also includes the introduction of a social dance.

Social Arts 102 is for students through age 14/grade 9 who have completed Social Arts 101 or its equivalent with another organization. In this class students continue to practice the basics while adding new skills such as eating difficult foods, entrepreneurship, interview skills and managing emergencies. Social dances will be practiced with the additions of turns and traveling.

Both classes are five monthly lessons. Tuition is $275 and class enrollment is limited to 26.

Register for 101 & 102

ClassThe Winter/Spring Semester of Social Arts Class will begin Friday, January 22. Openings are still available for both classes and registration is being accepted both online and by mail.

The feedback that we have received about classes is that they are a great balance of information and fun. As the session goes by, the hands-on activities and practice increase the confidence and abilities of the students.

Social Arts 101 is for students in grades 6 – 8 and covers many primary social skill such as introductions and dining etiquette. The students also learn and practice a repertory of social dances.

Social Arts 102 is for students in grades 7 – 9 that have either completes Social Arts 101 with Social Arts Atlanta or its equivalent with another organization. The class continues to practice the basics and adds important next level actives such as managing social media, interviewing skills and how to handle difficult foods. Social dances are practiced and turning and traveling are added.

Both classes are five lessons and tuition is $275. Registration is first come, first served and class size is limited to 26.

 

News: Registration Discount Until December 9

$25Social Arts Atlanta is pleased to announce a $25 discount for families who register students between November 11 and December 9, 2015. This offer is valid for classes during the 2016 Winter/Spring Semester.

Social Arts 101 and 102 will be offered starting on January 22 and run through May 14, 2016. 101 teaches and practices basic social skills including dining, introductions and social dances. 102 continues to practice the basics and adds skills such as interviewing for jobs and internships, managing specific difficult foods and leading and following turns for the five dances learned in 101. Both of these classes are five monthly sessions and tuition is $275.

Note: Families that are currently registered for a Winter/Spring Semester program will receive a $25 credit towards the tuition of their next Social Arts class or program.

Notes: To the Right

To_RightNo, this post is not about politics, it is about traffic flow. I am referring to the humanity on sidewalks and in public places. .

Recently, while walking back from a coffee shop with a friend, we came to a point where two other ladies were approaching from the opposite direction. These young ladies were involved with their conversation and phones. The sidewalk was not wide enough for all four of us to pass at once. My friend and I went immediately to the right and into single file mode, while the other two ladies continued on without a glance up from their bubble. We chuckled at their focus and commented on their lack of awareness of the world around them.

Then there is the ever awkward Side-to-Side Dance. This occurs when two people meet, one starts to yield and the other goes in the same direction. To avoid colliding, there is a series weight changes from one foot to the other, which results in the two finding the correct direction for each to pass safely. My observation is that there are between three and four changes of weight and that the right side usually prevails.

So, why is it that the right seems to be the preferred direction? Because the majority of us are right handed? For this post, I looked through the Social Arts Atlanta library and was not able to find any clues to the custom’s history. One of the earliest texts about etiquette that we have dates from 1884 and says;

Don’t neglect to keep the right of the promenade, otherwise there may be a collision and much confusion.

True, but is the “right of the promenade” the same as staying to the right? Promenade is French for walk. It is also a dance action in square dancing, a small turn on one leg in ballet and a feature of urban environments. Right could also mean correct and therefore not refer to direction.

After some time perusing blog posts on the internet, there seems to be a general convention that yielding to the right or left, walking to the right or left is dictated by the direction of vehicle traffic. There were no threads on why this is so and, sadly, it does not always follow. In Japan, they drive and walk on the left. In Australia and New Zealand, vehicle traffic is to the left and there is a “tendency, all be it a weak one” to walk to the left.  In England, vehicle traffic is to the left but according to Mr. Easton of the BBC;

Telling people how to walk is simply not British.

What should we do? The convention in the U.S. is to yield to the right. Everyday Manners published in 1923 emphatically directs boys and girls to;

Keep to the right always.

Then there is the width of the walkway to manage. Most texts about walking in public recommend walking no more than two across. If you are walking more than two across and/or the area is so narrow that only two can pass, someone has to fall back. The only advice I was able to find on how to do this also comes from Everyday Manners;

the member of your group who is at the outside of the walk should step behind the one next to him…

This works but does it need to be applied differently to a group with different ranks, ages and genders? Do ladies go ahead of gentlemen? A teenager should definitely fall behind a parent. But, what if someone in your party is elderly and it would be safer for an adult to lead? Certainly, the simplicity of who is on the outside is best but let your circumstance be your guide.

So, help humanity, work at keeping to the right (at least here at home in the U.S.) and, likely more important, being conscious that there are others that share the walkway with you. Awareness of others is helpful for both etiquette and politics.

Sources

Bunce, Oliver Bell. Don’t: A Manual of Mistakes & Improprieties More or Less Prevalent in Conduct and Speech. 2nd ed. Kent, England: Pryor Publications, 1982. Print. The Vellum-Parchment Shilling Series of Miscellaneous Literature.

Schultz, Dana H. “On Which Side (right/left) Should Pedestrians Walk on a Footpath? Frequently Asked in.” www.quora.com. 21 Aug. 2013. Web. 03 Nov. 2015.

Easton, Mark. “Advice for Foreigners on How Britons Walk – BBC News.”BBC News. N.p., 18 July 2014. Web. 02 Nov. 2015.

Faculty of the South Philadelphia High School for Girls. Everyday Manners for American Boys and Girls. New York: Macmillan, 1923. Print.

Notes: Why No Screens

Cell_PhonesWhy no screens at Social Arts Atlanta events?

We have all come to rely on these “smart” devises as a way to communicate, make notes, find information and take pictures. This collective data, words and images, can make so many things easier. Need to change the carpool schedule? Send a text. See just the right layout for a meeting? Snap a picture and email it to your assistant.

Yet, as with many fantastic and amazing things, there are down sides.

Screens document and broadcast the good and the bad. Creating an environment where students can make a mistake without the fear of being the subject of a post on social media, well intentioned or not, is important. We all need the space to mess up and try again, to practice and get our footing.

Phones, tablets and MP3 players can be used to create a physical barrier, a crutch, the techo means to “look the other way” from something uncomfortable. In social situations, this discomfort is likely caused by not knowing what to do or say. Because Social Arts’ classes do not allow screens and are relatively small and, student more naturally engage and learn that knowledge and practice are empowering. Most situations are not as difficult as you could ever image.

SAA’s no screen policy is both a protection and a way to make students open up, be uncomfortable to get more comfortable.

Quotes: Good Ways

The good ways, or the good rules for behaving, have lasted a long time – so they must have something.

-Munro Leaf

Leaf_HowBehave_OldWaysThis quote is from the author of The Story of Ferdinand, he wrote more than 40 children’s book from the mid-30s to the mid-70s. He even had a cartoon series. Munro was an observer of human behavior. In How to Behave and Why he works through honesty, fairness and strength (not physical but moral) which are the unpinning of manners and then etiquette.

Leaf, Munro. How to Behave and Why. New York: Universe, 1946. Print.